Jack Tyrrell specializes in Kakaako, Honolulu, Hawaii luxury condo projects.

Viewing entries tagged
gateway tower

Comment

Howard Hughes Corporation announces indefinite hold on Gateway Towers

Photo: Howard Hughes Corporation

Photo: Howard Hughes Corporation

The Howard Hughes Corporation announced big changes to its Ward Village Master Plan earlier this week. The long-anticipated, ultra-luxury Gateway Towers, designed by famed architect Richard Meier, has been indefinitely placed on hold. Buyers will be refunded deposits and offered other opportunities for homes at Ward Village. Howard Hughes President Simon Treacy also announced plans for elevated walkways that would connect Ward Village to Ala Moana Beach Park and Kewalo Basin over Ala Moana Boulevard, Auahi Street, and Ward Avenue.  The propose walkways would make connections to several Ward Village condo towers, perhaps at second-story levels where retail stores would be, as well as ground connections at points including a central public plaza within Ward Village.

Read more from Hawaii Public Radio, below:

The Howard Hughes Corporation is playing a big role in changing the look of Honolulu’s urban landscape. Simon Treacy joined the company as president in January, and this week he announced the first major changes to the master plan of Ward Village. Pacific Business News editor in chief A. Kam Napier has more.


One of the signature projects of the Ward Village masterplan has been the Gateway Towers, two luxury high rises that would flank the greenspace of the Ward Village Central Plaza, which broke ground last week. Combined, the Gateway Towers would have comprised 236 units and were designed by Richard Meier of Richard Meier & Partners.

Yesterday, Howard Hughes Corp. informed buyers of the Gateway Towers that the buildings have been put on hold indefinitely.

It’s the first major change to the master plan, but not the last according to president Simon Treacy. He also announced this week plans for greener, more park-like experience as Ward Village evolves. The signature piece of this new approach is a proposed, landscaped elevated walkway that would connect Ward Village to Kewalo Basin by going over Ala Moana Boulevard. Imagine something like New York’s High Line as an example of what this could be.

Treacy, with a background in investments and private equity, has lived around the world and tells PBN he views Singapore as a model for urban development.  “Over 63 percent of Singapore is green and we want to have that same level of green around,” he tells PBN.

Other aspects of this move for Ward Village include wider sidewalks with more landscaping and more parks.

Comment

Comment

Pacific Business News Tours Ward Warehouse Demolition

If you have driven along Ala Moana Boulevard lately, the mauka side is starting to look a lot different.  Not only is Waiea now the dominant presence, with its sweeping architecture hard to ignore, but an old, familiar landmark is now gone: Ward Warehouse.  The Howard Hughes Corporation began their demolition of the Ward Warehouse earlier this July in order to make way for its Gateway Towers development.  The redevelopment of the parcel will feature a park in between two towers, creating an improved mauka to makai connection from Kewalo Harbor to Ward Village.

Read more updates from Pacific Business News' tour of the current state of the Ware Warehouse demolitions, below. And view more photos online on Pacific Business News' website, here.

It’s a matter of weeks now before Honolulu’s Ward Warehouse becomes just a memory, as The Howard Hughes Corp. clears the land to make way for a future mixed-use tower under its Ward Village master plan.

Re-use Hawaii spent this week salvaging old-growth Douglas fir beams, fixtures and other building materials from the site, as Layton Construction worked to demolish the areas where salvaging had already taken place.

Quinn Vittum, executive director of Re-use Hawaii, said the work to salvage material from the retail and restaurant center, which closed on July 31, is taking place in two phases. The first phase, which started in August, recovered such interior items as doors, cabinets, plumbing fixtures and lights from retail stores and the Old Spaghetti Factory, Kincaid’s and Stuart Anderson’s Cattle Co. restaurants. 

The second phase is to recover the large beams and other lumber from the structure.

Vittum said the lumber is clear vertical grain Douglas fir that was milled from trees harvested in northern California or the Pacific Northwest in the mid 1970s.

Vittum said Re-use Hawaii expects to be finished in early January. After that, it’s off to salvage items from Ward Plaza, and then the warehouses across Auahi Street before they are also demolished for future phases of Ward Village

Comment